Engine 1

  • Manufacturer: Pierce Fire Apparatus
  • Year: 2005
  • Purpose: Water Supply/Hazmat
  • Pump Size: 2,250 GPM
  • Tank Size: 500 Gals.
  • Officer: Lt. Dave (Max) Burns, Jr
  • Assistant: FF Forrest Edelman

 

Engine 1 is a Class A Pumper with the ability to play the role of attack engine at a fire scene. The primary function of Engine 1 is to provide a continuous water supply to the department's other attack engines (E-3, E-4, and E-7) through a large five inch diameter hose. Designed and built by Pierce Fire Apparatus in Appleton, Wisconsin, Engine 1 has some key characteristics that enable it to deliver large amounts of water ? continuously ? from water sources up to a mile away from a fire scene. With a massive 2,250 gallons per minute pump and a large array of drafting hoses and strainers, this engine can be staged at any one of dozens of natural and man-made water sources (ponds, rivers, swimming pools) where it can single handedly deliver all the water that is needed to most any fire, large or small. Through a comprehensive mapping system created and maintained by the WVFD Water Supply Committee, and a series of dry hydrants which are quick connect 'access points', Engine 1 can effectively blanket the town with an unlimited water supply.

Engine 2

  • Manufacturer: Chassis by Peterbilt, Body by E-ONE
  • Year: 1997
  • Purpose: Tanker
  • Pump Size: 1,500 GPM
  • Tank Size: 2,500 Gals.
  • Officer: Lt. Eric Carter
  • Assistant: FF Bill Umhoefer

 

Engine 2 is our tanker. A tanker has an express purpose of shuttling water to the fire scene to enable fire suppression activities until Engine 1 is set up. When all our engines arrive at the scene of a fire, we have 6,000 gallons of water to use. This may sound like a lot of water, and it is, but it goes fast if you are aggressively fighting a fire. The attack pumpers can put out as much as 1,500 Gallons per minute. At that rate that, 6,000 gals will be gone in just 4 minutes. However, the usual situation calls for only 200 or 300 gallons per minute, so the tanker water lasts for quite a while. Engine 2 responds on all automatic mutual aid calls to the Town of Wilton.

Engine 3

  • Manufacturer: Chassis and Body by Pierce
  • Year: 2009
  • Purpose: Attack and Support
  • Pump Size: 1,500 GPM
  • Tank Size: 1,000 Gals.
  • Officer: Capt. Steve Ash
  • Assistant: FF Andrew Wynn

 

A Class A pumper, Engine 3 is the first due engine out of Norfield Station #1 for all structure fires, brush fires, and vehicle calls on the west side of town. Engine 3 features a portable Hurst combination tool.

Engine 4

  • Manufacturer: Chassis and Body by Pierce
  • Year: 2010
  • Purpose: Attack and Support
  • Pump Size: 1,500 GPM
  • Tank Size: 1,000 Gals.
  • Officer: Capt. Chuck Noble
  • Assistant: FF Steve Russo

 

Engine 4 is a Class A pumper operating out of the Lyons Plain Road Station #2 and the twin of Engine 3. Engine 4 is the first due engine to the east side of town for all structure fires, brush fires, and vehicle calls. Engine 4 has been called upon to cover parts of neighboring Easton, Fairfield, and Westport when portions of those towns have been cut off from access by their own departments.

Engine 7

  • Manufacturer: Chassis and Body by Pierce
  • Year: 2001
  • Purpose: Attack Pumper
  • Pump Size: 1,500 GPM
  • Tank Size: 1,000 Gals.
  • Officer: Lt. John Braden
  • Assistant: FF Marc Barenberg

 

Engine 7 is a Class A pumper operating out of Norfield Station #1. Engine 7 is the second engine dispatched for all structure fires (east & west). Of all of our apparatus, Engine 7 is the most active. There are very few calls for which Engine 7 does not appear on the dispatch list. Engine 7 can act as either an attack pumper or a water tanker.

Rescue 5

  • Manufacturer: Ford F550
  • Year: 2003
  • Purpose: Special tools, lighting, air, and support
  • Body: Custom by Hackney Emergency Vehicles
  • Officer: Lt. Jason Greenfield
  • Assistant: FF Dellicarpini

 

The most common emergency response will be car accidents and carbon monoxide incidents. The truck has a full assortment of Hurst tools (cutters, spreaders, rams); a 12,500-pound electric wench; assorted hand and power tools (e.g., chain saws, cutoff saws); rescue equipment (ropes, harness, stokes baskets). There is also enough storage on the truck to carry 27 air bottles which is used for air packs. Rescue 5 is carefully loaded with enough material to handle any emergency.

Truck 6

  • Manufacturer: Ford F-350
  • Year: 2004
  • Purpose: Utility Vehicle
  • Supervisor: FF Andrew Wynn

 

 

 

Truck 6 is a pickup used for various jobs within the department. It is quartered at Station 1 on Norfield Road. Truck 6 is a work horse. The department uses it to carry hoses back from fires, transport firefighters to training and incidents, and other activities. Unlike most of our vehicles, Truck 6 was purchased with funds donated by current and former Weston residents.

Truck 8

  • Manufacturer: Ford F-250
  • Year: 2015
  • Purpose: Utility Vehicle
  • Supervisor: FF Andrew Wynn

 

Truck 8 is a pickup used for various jobs within the department. It is quartered at Station 2 on Lyons Plain Road. Truck 8 is a work horse. The department uses it to carry hoses back from fires, transport firefighters to training and incidents, and other activities. Unlike most of our vehicles, Truck 8 was purchased with funds donated by current and former Weston residents.

Old Mack

  • Manufacturer: Mack
  • Year: 1934
  • Purpose: Currently a classic show piece.
  • Pump Size: 500 GPM
  • Tank Size: 250 Gals.
  • Supervisor: Capt. Chuck Noble

 

The Old Mack was the first fire engine purchase by the fledgling Weston Volunteer Fire Department and until the mid '50s was the only fire engine in town. It was purchased with a loan cosigned by the members of the department. The cost? About $3,500 before add-ons such as hoses and nozzles. Although semi-retired in the early '60s when the town bought two modern fire engines, it saw action in 1963 when the original Hurlbutt Elementary School burned, and even up through the late '70s would occasionally be put into service when another unit was down for repairs. In the late '70s and early '80s it was winning trophies with the department's muster team. Although now fully retired, it remains a functional fire engine.